New Zealand Migration Flow 2011

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Net migration flow into New Zealand remained positive throughout the global financial crisis and the Christchurch earthquakes, but the Government predicts more people will come and join to rebuild the nation.

Figures released by the Department of Labour  showed levels of “permanent and long-term” skilled migration had increased by 7 % comparing to 2010.

 

However the experts predict about 6000 more permanent migrants flowing into the country in the 2013 year.

The permanent and long term migration figure measures people who intend to stay in New Zealand for longer than a year, or New Zealanders returning after an absence of more than a year.

A report published by the centre said current migration patterns were consistent with a cycle which saw low net migration figures towards the end of each decade.

“The more recent increase in trans-Tasman migration indicates this was a temporary phenomenon as departures of New Zealand citizens increased in 2011 towards pre-recession levels,” the report said.

The Department of Labour is forecasting increased migration to Australia over the next year, but signs of a slowing labour market across the Tasman and improving employment prospects at home mean departures are expected to ease later this year.

Over the last decade 64 per cent of New Zealand citizen departures had been to Australia.

Apparently, half of Indian skilled professional is upping sticks & moving out to New Zealand, whilst half of the young Kiwis are abandoning NZ & heading for the golden shores of Australia. Although the UK population is rising, that’s largely because of immigration, about 30%of which is from outside the EU, as more Brits than ever are heading to Europe(Spain, France) – and of course, to the Antipodes.

While Kiwis’ migration to Australia was always a hot topic, experts says the proportion of New Zealanders making the shift was actually only around 1 per cent of the population per year, as opposed to the late-1970s when around 1.4 per cent of the population was making the move.

Meanwhile net long-term migration from non-New Zealand citizens coming into the country was 33,800 for 2011, up roughly 10 per cent on 2010 but still lower than the 40,100 gain of 2009.

While applications for permanent residency under SMC, numbers of international students and temporary and seasonal workers were up.

New international students accounted for 38,658 of the 60,200 non-Kiwi citizen arrivals in 2011, with India contributing the largest number of new students.

India is also New Zealand’s second largest source of skilled migrants.

China still contributes the most students overall and the United Kingdom provides the most skilled worker migrants, although that proportion has continued to decline.

“While there was a global slowdown in the number of permanent migrants and temporary workers, international student numbers to New Zealand continue to rise, up 2 per cent to 74,800 over the last year,” .

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